There are 26 temples in Karasuyama, with beauty and charm in each of them. Okubo Sekizai can assist you.

TEL0120-522-148
ReceptionTime 8:00~18:00 Wednesday is our regular holiday

Welcome to Teramachi - Fot Visitors

Teramachi means "temple district".
Chitose-karasuyama is an area studded with more than 20 temples in a leafy part of Setagaya ward.Rare in central Tokyo, there are also historical and traditional graveyards within easy access.Take a stroll around Karasuyama Teramachi, while enjoying the scenery in each season.

You can:
■Get maps of Teramachi.
■Get a free ride to temples.
■Watch videos of temple tours.
※All are available free of charge at Okubo Sekizai.
 Please contact Okubo Sekizai for further information.

Why is Karasuyama Teramachi popular?
■It has good access.
■The cemeteries are on flat land.
■The celeteries are well maintained.
■It is in a good natural environment.

Maps of Karasuyama-Teramachi

Click on each temple to go to the information about it.
【If you want to see larger map, Click here.】


臨済宗 高源院 真宗(東)永願寺 浄土宗 専光寺 法華宗 永隆寺 真宗(西)妙祐寺 真宗(東)存明寺 法華宗 妙寿寺 真宗(西)浄因寺 真宗(西)善行寺 真宗(西)萬福寺 真宗(西)妙善寺 浄土宗 宗福寺 浄土宗 稱往院 日蓮宗 幸龍寺 真宗(東)乗満寺 真宗(大谷)入楽寺 浄土宗 源良院 真宗(西)源正寺 真宗(西)常栄寺 真言宗 多聞院 日蓮宗 玄照寺 日蓮宗 妙陽寺 浄土真宗 順正寺 顕本法華宗 常福寺 真宗(東)西蓮寺 日蓮宗 妙高寺 大久保石材店 フリーダイヤル 0120-522-148

★Please feel free to contact Ohkubo-Sekizai.★  TEL : 0120-522-148
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1. Nichiren Sect. Myoko-ji

The temple moved to Karasuyama in 1927 after the Great Kanto Earthquake in 1923. It retains a grave of the Mizuno family, the lord of the Yamagata domain. There are graves of Fujii Umon, an advocate of the restoration of the Imperial rule, three Japanese-style painters: Hayami gyoshu, Imamura Shiko, Komura Settai, and Kawanobe Iccho, a lacquer artist.
Myoko-ji URL http://www.myokozi.com

 

2. Shingon Sect. Buzan School Tamon-in

The temple was originally located in Nishi-shinjuku. After it was burnt in the Second World War, the graveyard was moved to Karasuyama in 1949 and the main building in 1954. There is a three-meter-high “grave of 568 unknown people”, which enshrines those who died of in the Tenmei Famine.

 

3. Shinshu-otani School Joman-ji

The temple was originally located in Kaga and called Rinsho Temple. After moving to Setsu, Fushimi, Suruga then Edo, it changed its name to Joman Temple. It moved to Karasuyama in 1924. In the Edo period the themple had many patrons among vassals of the shogun.

 

4. Shinshu-otani School Nyuraku-ji

It was built in Hiramatsu-cho, Nihonbashi in 1648. After being moved to Matsuyama-cho, Asakusa, it was burnt down in the Great Kanto Earthquake. It moved to Karasuyama in 1927.

 

5. Jodo-shin Sect. Honganji School Joei-ji

The buildings were all burnt in the Great Kanto Earthquake except for the principal image and the necrology. It moved to Karasuyama from Tsukiji in 1924. There are the remains of a foundation stone of Kikuta Ishu, a Japanese-style painter.
Joei-ji URL http://joueiji.net

 

6. Jodo-shin Sect. Honganji School Gensho-ji

The temple moved to Karasuyama from Tsukiji in 1932. They have metal tubs made by Fujiwara Shoji, a master of foundry in the Edo period, which were chosen to be cultural assets.

 

7. Nichiren Sect. Shinryu-ji

The temple was originally built as a prayer hall for the Tokugawa family. It moved to Hamamatsu, Suruga, Yushima then Asakusa. It was damaged in the Great Kanto Earthquake. Its relocation to Karasuyama began in 1927 and was completed in 1940.

 

8. Shinshu-otani School Zonmyo-ji

The temple was built at Sakurada-mon in the early Edo period. It moved to Azabu in the Meiji period, then to Karasuyama in 1927 after the 1923 earthquake. Teachings written by the chief priest are on display at the gate, and they are changed from time to time. Please have a look.
Zonmyo-ji URL http://www.zonmyoji.jp

 

9. Jodo Sect. Sho-oh-in

The temple was built in Yushima in 1596, then moved to Asakusa. It moved to Karasuyama in 1927 after the 1923 earthquake.

 

10. Jodo-shin Sect. Honganji School Myoyu-ji

The temple was re-built in Shibuya in 1625 with the statue of Amidabutsu which was dug out from the ground. It moved to Karasuyama due to the construction of the Ginza Line in 1937 and the re-zoning plan in 1949. They have a unique main building which was built in the Indian style.

 

★Please feel free to contact Ohkubo-Sekizai.★  TEL : 0120-522-148
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11. Jodo Sect. Sofuku-ji

The temple moved to Karasuyama from Nippori after the 1923 earthquake.

 

12. Hokke Sect. Eiryu-ji

Nichiyoshi, a holy priest who taught the game of go to Tokugawa Ieyasu, built the temple in Kanda. Daikoku, a stone statue as the temple’s treasure, was given to the temple by Oman, one of Ieyasu’s concubines. The temple moved to Yanaka, Honjo, then to Karasuyama in 1928 after the 1923 earthquake. There is a grave of Sanyutei Ensho, a comic storyteller who was designated as a living national treasure.

 

13. Jodo-shin Sect. Honganji School Join-ji

The temple used to retain a grave of the Kuroda family, who were clansmen in Fukuoka. It moved from Azabu to Karasuyama in 1924.

 

14. Jodo-shin Sect. Honganji School Zengyo-ji

The temple was originally built around Yokoyama-cho, Chuo-ku in the early Edo period, then moved to Tsukiji due to the large fire in the Meireki period. It moved to Karasuyma after the 1923 earthquake.

 

15. Jodo-shin Sect. Honganji School Manpuku-ji

The temple was built in Hamacho in the early Edo period, then moved to Tsukiji during the Meireki period. It moved to Karasuyama after the 1923 earthquake.

 

16. Jodo-shin Sect. Honganji School Myozen-ji

Sugawara Shoen, a vassal of the Hojo family, was converted to Buddhism, became a pupil of Shinran and built a thatched cottage in Ise. It is said to have been the origin of the temple. It moved to Tsukiji where the priests were engaged in missionary work. So they have many believers among fish market workers. It moved to Karasuyama in 1927.

 

17. Hokke Sect. Myoju-ji

The temple was originally built in Yanaka. It moved to Honjo-sarue, then to Karasuyama in 1924 after the 1923 earthquake. There is a temple bell made by Fujiwara Shoji, a master of foundry, which was partly burnt in the 1923 earthquake. The guest room was relocated from the former house of the Prince Nabeshima. Shoryubyo, a hall to worship for future generations was newly built in 2000.

 

18. Jodo Sect. Senko-ji

The temple was originally built in Shinagawa, and moved to Bakurai-cho, then Asakusa. It moved to Karasuyama in 1927 after the 1923 earthquake. The main building and the monks’ living quarters were burnt due to the air raid in 1945. The main building was re-built in 1958. There is a grave of Kitagawa Utamaro, an ukiyo-e artist.

 

19. Shinshu-otani School Eigan-ji

Jojun, a vassal of the Hori family in Echigo became a priest and built the temple in Kanda. It moved to Asakusa. The buildings were damaged by the 1923 earthquake, but its principle image Amidabutu statue and the necrology were saved from the fire.

 

20. Rinzai Sect. Kogen-in

Arima Yorimoto, the fourth lord of the Kurume domain, was converted to Buddhism and built the temple in Shinagawa. Ikei, the first priest of the temple, mastered the tea ceremony. The Ikei division of the Ishikawa school still exists. The temple moved to Karasuyama in 1926. Its pond, Benten-ike, is known as a spot where wild ducks come and stay. In the center of the pond, there is a little shrine, Ukigodo, which enshrines Hosho Benzaiten.

 

★Please feel free to contact Ohkubo-Sekizai.★  TEL : 0120-522-148
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21. Jodo Sect. Genryo-in

The temple moved to Karasuyama from Asakusa in 1925 due to the 1923 earthquake. It used to be a temple for trainee monks. It enshrines Hifuse-kanzeon-bosatsu, which was believed to protect the Edo towns from further damage from the fires.

 

22. Nichiren Sect. Myoyo-ji

The temple moved to Karasuyama from Yanaka-imosaka in 1928.

 

23. Nichiren Sect Gensho-ji

Nichien, a priest brought up by Kato Kiyomasa, built the temple in Shiba-shirogane. It moved to Karasuyama in 1927. There is a grave of the Togawa family in the Niwase domain and a statue of Kishibozin, the goddess of childbirth and children.

 

24. Kenpon-hokke Sect. Jofuku-ji

The temple was built in Asakusa in 1511, then moved to Karasuyama in 1928 due to the 1923 earthquake. In the precincts there are porcelain racoon dogs in all sizes, which symbolize wealth and happiness.
Jofuku-ji URL http://www.joufukuji.com

 

25. Shinshu Sect. Junsho-ji

 

26. Shinshu-otani School Sairen-ji

Shusei, born into a samurai family, became a priest and built the temple in Sakurada-mon. It moved to Torano-mon, Mita then to Karasuyama in 1939. There is a grave of Kokugakuin Kugayama School. There is also a unique temple gate with Tsukiji-style fences.
Sairen-ji BLOG http://sairen99.cocolog-nifty.com/kotoba/

 

★Please feel free to contact Ohkubo-Sekizai.★  TEL : 0120-522-148
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Maps of Sengawa-Teramachi

Temples which were severely damaged in the Great Kanto Earthquake in 1923 located their new precincts in suburban areas. Wakaba-cho in Chofu has six temples of the Honganji school which moved from Tsukiji. Now the area is called Sengawa Teramachi. On the north side of Sengawa station, there is also a temple called Sho-oh Temple of Tendai school, which was built there in 1600. Around the area, there are several schools such as Metropolitan Jindai High School, Toho Gakuen and Shirayuri College in a good environment. Temples are located within a five-minute walk on flat land, so you can get there easily.



1. Tendai school Sho-oh-ji

The temple was built in Sengawa during the Keicho era (1596-1615). The principal image, Amidabutsu, and the other statues like Kannon-bosatsu, Fudoson, Emma, and Kotobuki-rojin are enshrined in the main building.

2. Jodo-shin Sect. Honganji school Myosai-ji

The first priest came from Matsumoto, Shinshu to Edo and built the temple in Kanda-sakumacho in 1622. After moving to Tsukiji, it relocated to Sengawa in 1927 due to the 1923 earthquake. There is Muryojubyo, a joint graveyard for perpetuity in the precincts.
Myosai-ji URL http://www.myousaiji.or.jp

3. Jodo-shin Sect. Honganji school Saisho-ji

The temple was founded by Ryogen in Yokoyama-cho, Asakusa, in the Kanei era. After moving to Tsukiji, it relocated to Sengawa in 1928.

4. Jodo-shin Sect. Honganji school Kosai-ji

It was originally built in Azabu in the Warring States period. After moving to Tsukiji, it relocated to Sengawa in 1931 due to the 1923 earthquake.

★Please feel free to contact Ohkubo-Sekizai.★  TEL : 0120-522-148
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